The Gadsden flag’s murky symbolism to Trump’s riotous base

In 1730, my fourth-great grandfather, Benjamin Andrew, was born in the Dorchester Colony near Pon Pon, South Carolina. A planter, he eventually moved to the settlement of Midway, Georgia and owned a large agricultural plantation near Colonel’s Island, Georgia. He was a contemporary of southern revolutionaries such as Lyman Hall, George Walton, and Telfair, was named the president of the Council of Safety, was a delegate to the Continental Congress, and later, a Congressman from the State of Georgia. …


Travelling carnivals were the highlight of community life for poor children in 1930s and 40s America. Rural schoolchildren would save their money and, when the carnival pulled in and set up in a dirt field just out of town, they were ready for the dubious delights that would await. The two headed man! The house of mirrors! Games of chance.

The success of any con game depends somewhat on distraction and somewhat on the gullibility of the subject. At the old time carnivals, the games of chance were rigged against you. The sweet treats were sweet only for a moment…


I live in a small mountain town in western North Carolina, in the heart of the Bible belt, in the heart of Trumpland. I drive by at least two of the Gadsden flags in a two mile section of road near my house, just outside my town of approximately 500 loyal Trump supporters, both flying aloft, all alone, on flagpoles in the front of single-wide trailers set in the woods.

Slightly further afield, along Interstate 40 near Charlotte, North Carolina, one sees enormous Confederate Battle flags flying atop 50’ flagpoles near the Interstate, on private land, for all to see…


I was in the Ralph Lauren section of a department store, doing my usual grousing about my lack of a supermodel body, when I got the call that I might have cancer. It filled me with a kind of dread, but, there in the back of my mind, the news was of no great significance. I was sure I would be okay, that same sort of surety that you are equally certain of its betrayal. I took the call, listened carefully, sat on a chair to catch my breath and decided that the only logical next step, in that moment…


Photo by Maan Limburg on Unsplash

In the late 1980s, the short-lived XFL took professional football by a very short lived storm. Billed as rougher and sexier than that bastion of American beer drinking — the NFL — the XFL was filled with colorful characters, perhaps none of whom was more colorful than running back Rod Smart, known on the field as “He Hate Me.”

In a promo for the league, the affable Smart holds up his jersey and proclaims something to effect that his opponents hated him because he was faster, stronger, and, well, smarter than the average player. …

Lynn Morris

Passionate about geopolitics, gender equity, globalism,…wine. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08B7KJCDM

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